Live And Let Die – Wings (1973)

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An individual, limited edition, example of vinyl record art made from a genuine, original, 45rpm, 7” single featuring the song, Live And Let Die by  Wings. The record was released in 1973, on the Apple record label and has been reworked into head of the top hatted and skull masked Voodoo figure Baron Samedi, as played by the late actor, dancer, choreographer and singer Geoffrey Holder from the film ‘Live and Let Die’.

A great framed gift for a friend or family member who is a fan of Wings, James Bond, Voodoo, Paul McCartney or has a special memory linked to the song.

Presented in a black wooden box frame
Limited Edition of 100, signed and numbered by myself, the artist

Title: Live And Let Die
Media Artist/s: Wings
Record Label: Apple
Medium: Mixed media, hand cut from an original 7″ vinyl single
Era: 1970s
Genre: Rock / Pop Rock

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Description

Description

Additional information about this, Wings vinyl art.

Wings – The Artist/s

Paul McCartney and Wings (also known by their original name Wings) were a British–American rock band formed in 1971 by former Beatle Paul McCartney, his wife Linda on keyboards, session drummer Denny Seiwell, and former Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine. Wings were noted for frequent personnel changes along with their commercial successes, going through three lead guitarists and four drummers. However, the core trio of the McCartneys and Laine remained intact throughout the group’s existence. In 1977, the band earned their only UK number one single, with “Mull of Kintyre”, which became the then-best-selling UK single in history. 

Live And Let Die – The Song

Live And Let Die is the theme song of the 1973 James Bond film of the same name, performed by the British–American rock band Wings. Written by English musician Paul McCartney and his wife Linda McCartney, it reunited McCartney with former Beatles producer George Martin, who produced the song and arranged the orchestra. McCartney was contacted to write the song by the film’s producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli before the screenplay was finished. Wings recorded “Live and Let Die” during the sessions for Red Rose Speedway in October 1972 at AIR Studios. It was also the first rock song to open a Bond film. Upon release, “Live and Let Die” was the most successful Bond theme up to that point. The song also received positive reviews from music critics and continues to be praised as one of McCartney’s best songs.

The Voodoo Figure – The Shape

This record had been modelled into the head of the top hatted and skull masked Voodoo figure, Baron Samedi, as played by the late actor, dancer, choreographer and singer Geoffrey Holder from the film ‘Live and Let Die’.

Live and Let Die is a 1973 spy film; it is the eighth film in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions and the first to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. It was directed by Guy Hamilton and produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman. The film is based on Ian Fleming’s novel of the same name. The storyline involves a Harlem drug lord known as Mr. Big who plans to distribute two tons of heroin for free to put rival drug barons out of business and then become a monopoly supplier. Mr. Big is revealed to be the alter ego of Dr. Kananga, a corrupt Caribbean dictator, who rules San Monique, a fictional island where opium poppies are secretly farmed. Bond is investigating the deaths of three British agents, leading him to Kananga, and he is soon trapped in a world of gangsters and voodoo as he fights to put a stop to the drug baron’s scheme. Live and Let Die was released during the height of the blaxploitation era, and many blaxploitation archetypes and clichés are depicted in the film, including derogatory racial epithets (“honky”), black gangsters, and pimpmobiles. It departs from the former plots of the James Bond films about megalomaniac super-villains, and instead focuses on drug trafficking, a common theme of blaxploitation films of the period. It is set in African American cultural centres such as Harlem and New Orleans, as well as the Caribbean Islands.

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Additional information

Weight 1030 g
Dimensions 25 × 4.5 × 25 cm
Artist Formation

Group / Band

Decade

70's

Gender

Male & Female

Nationality

American, English

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